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of the plan will take money from the depositors. cyprus has an economy the size of vermont but the assets eight times more than the country's gdp. therein the financial woes come as no surprise to analysts. listen to what alan greenspan said friday. >> europe has been hanging over the american markets for quite a while. the removal of that risk, i think temporarily, i think it is only temporary, has enabled the underlying forces of the market to begin to come into vision. >> and today, the clearer vision that greenspan referred to was clouded the cyprus, we have the report by cyprus matters. >> reporter: cyprus is a smaller island with a smaller economy. but now they're watching what happens in the tiny mediterranean nation. >> it's a tiny nation. the reason we care about it is of course cyprus like it was in greece. it's what it means for the bigger nations if they follow and go down the same bath. >> banking is a huge part of cyprus' economy. and it's a mess. if it fails the country will probably fail, too and the european union will not let the country fail. here's the thing, the bigge
the same bath. >> banking is a huge part of cyprus' economy. and it's a mess. if it fails the country will probably fail, too and the european union will not let the country fail. here's the thing, the biggest payers are the russians. >> they don't want to bail out the depositors because they are mainly russians. that's what the issue is. >> so finance makers said depositors are going be compensated. but with the stock market down some 60 percent those chairs are essentially wortless. >> the blanks are closed and won't open until votes on the bailout measure. people are waiting in lines at atms to withdraw money from their accounts and countries are worried around the world that citizens would take money out of their banks that's why even the most seasoned wall street veterans watching what happens in the tiny island in the mediterranean. for "nightly business report" i'm sue herrera. >> so what does it mean to american investors? we turn to the ceo of pimco the world's largest bond fund. i asked if the situation in cypress is unique or is it a serious issue for the u.s.? >> it is mai
and this is all going to put more sales in the regional economy and again there is so much business activity. and we are blessed with just being in this part of the country and the world. i'm very interested in what we are going to hear from our speakers this morning to sort off guide us through this year. now before we get to our program please join me in thanking the organizations and people who made this possible. and you can clap now for awful them but -- this event is jointly presented by san francisco business times and our partner, title sponsor corn irand carey commercial new mark, night, frank. and we are going it hear from dan clef man and dan class man some 14 year ago really came up with this idea, we sat down over lunch and there was another person involved allen cline knelt and which came up with this idea and so i have to give dan much much credit for that. (applause). . very much so. and in 2012, cornish and carey, dominated the area of commercial real estate with over $6 billion in leasing and sales transactions so very good there. and you are soon going to hear from dan
to be fiscally responsible and reduce the deficit. to make velft to grow our economy and to meet our obligation to our seniors, to our families and to our future and the republican budget fails all three. republican budget threatens our nation by undermining our economic growth and by shifting the financial burden for the deficit, and the deficit reduction, to our seniors and the middle class. republicans have made their choices clear, end medicare as we know it, adding costs to seniors today and ending the medicare guarantee tomorrow, slashing investments necessary for economic competitiveness and giving millionaires an average of $400,000 in tax breaks. republican budget eliminates protection for millions of our sickest seniors who depend on nursing home and home health services and republican budget will increase taxes for average middle-class families by $3,000. their choices will cost two million jobs next year alone and decrease economic growth by 1.7%. in contrast, the democratic alternative present serves -- preserves the medicare guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation
it is important to realize that it is possible to make investments in our economy today, create jobs, repeal the sequester, and still reduce our deficit in a responsible and laled way. -- and balanced way. in closing i urge my colleagues not to be scared by the rhetoric that sometimes we hear. instead, i urge my colleagues to support one of the multiple budget proposals that reduce our deficit responsibly while creating jobs today and protecting the important programs like medicaid and medicare for generations to come. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i thank the gentlelady for being with me on the floor today. i'll say that we sometimes have some controversy in the rules committee, mr. speaker. there is a lot of responsibility that lies in the rules committee. with 435 folks here in this chamber. we all would like to have our say. we'd all like to have our say probably more than once. and the rules committee's tasked wi
, growing the economy, strengthening the middle class and reducing the deficit. our proposal puts people to work this year with specific and targeted investments, while investing also in education, energy, research and infrastructure and keeping our commitment to america's seniors. our plan is fair, balanced, reasonable and responsible. it is pro-growth, pro-people, pro-america and approach favored by the majority in this country. i yield back the balance of my time. mr. horsford: thank you, congresswoman bass. and to focus on jobs and investing in our future, the fact that is pro-growth, pro-people and 70% of the american people support this type of approach is why the c.b.c. is offering this as an alternative to the house republican majority. and to speak further on the pro-growth needs of this budget, my representative -- my colleague, i should say in the new freshman class. it's been a delight to get to know her, the gentlelady from ohio, representative beatty. mrs. beatty: thank you so much. thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to discuss house budget committee chairman ryan's fisca
-sixth of the economy in order to be able to gain control of our lives, and of course it's going to be a mess. what does the government do that is good when it starts interfering with our lives? there are functions for the government. they need to remember what those things are and leave the rest of us alone. >> neil: what they discovered, as you warned -- this is prior to your prayer breakfast meet and greet with the president -- that all of a sudden the goodies would be showcased up front. the problems would be later. the goodies were fewer, the problems many more, and the cost of this potentially much, much hire than the thought. how is all of this rolling out now? >> well, of course the reason that it was done in secret, rather than in a transparent manner in which it was supposed to have been done, is because there are so many bad parts of it. there's so many obligations so many new taxes associated with it. it's incredibly expense simple. it was supposed to lower the cost. it has raised the cost of the premiums for average family, and in the neighborhood of $5,000. this is a disaster. and the real
company with extraordinarily small economy. the fact it would precipitate a run with the greek banks or italian banks and bring down the entire system in europe, fumbling along, kicking the can down the road is really pretty fried and we know from experience these events, whether in the balkins with the shooting of an arch duke or whether in cyprus with the shooting of a banking system can lead to fairly significant consequences for the entire european continent and us. >> so far, the worst-case scenario hasn't happened yet. so far. that's good. let me ask you, steve forbes. do you believe that the united states can make itself immune? are we strong enough economically, and financially, to withstand the kind of worst-case scenario that senator gregg discussed? >> the answer is no. we should have learned that from 2008 when these dominos start to topple. it hits everybody. and this is what is so inexplicable. why did the germans draw the line on this, for sheer domestic political reasons. they don't want to be bailing out russian oil gargs. they have an election this year. they have k
. >>> not even a down economy can crush rock and roll. legendary kiss rockers gene simmons and paul stanley kick off a big expan shun of their restaurants. they're here in first on fox interview to tell us why now is the time to bet on the consumer. even when they say it's not it is always about money melissa: first let's turn to today's market moment. fears over cyprus's bailout led to a choppy day of trading on wall street. the dow managed to eke out a slight gain with the nasdaq and s&p 500 posting minor laws. the s&p fell for the third straight session. that is the worst losing streak of the year. microsoft could be in some hot water with the justice department. microsoft and some of its business partners are being investigated over a foreign bribery claims. government officials in china, italy and romania were allegedly bribed to earn software contracts but shares of microsoft still managed to close the day up slightly. >>> all right we start tonight in cyprus. the parliament rejected the tax on bank deposits, potentially killing the bailout but russia is floating another option, gazprom, w
%, which meant it was getting broad support from all sectors of the economy. i did make a mistake, which was turning it over to iraqi politicians. i should have turned it over to judges, people who did not have a political ax to grind. on the army, there was no question it was the right thing to do not to recall the army. we should have not said it was disbanding it. the pentagon said it would be self-demobilized. it would have been a big mistake to have called the army back. it would have led to the break up iraq. the kurds were very clear they would secede. when we did try to bring back a single battalion in april 2004, it went immediately over to the insurgency and started shooting at americans. it did not work. building the army from the bottom up -- a new army from the bottom up -- was the right path. today, the iraqi army is the most respected institution in the country. >> when you look back your tenure in baghdad, it was a difficult time. are you proud of what you did? >> i am satisfied. proud is probably going to far. i think that the 3000 civilians who work in the cpa from 25 d
's iconic brands think of the economy and the american consumer? susie sits down with the top man at coca-cola. all that and more coming up right now on "nbr." good evening and welcome to our public television viewers. susie, once again, little cyprus making big economic noise today. >> you're right, tyler. actually a big win for citizens in cyprus. lawmakers rejected today an unpopular and unprecented proposal to tax bank deposits. it was part of a larger eurozone bailout plan to rescue those banks and keep the nation solvent. the crucial vote came after a wave of protests, and as cypr t cypriots scrambled to withdraw cash from their atms. bertha coombs joins us with more on today's historic vote and what's ahead for cyprus? >> what's ahead is a very big question. the world was watching the tiny island nation again today, in a show of hands-on opposition, party members voted no on a tax and 10% of bank deposits, a condition set by eurozone officials to secure 10 billion euro bailout. many called it extortion. ruling party members abstained saying beyond saying no they need to find anoth
to share with you some views of the economy from our 54 respo respondents. firming housing prices are a game changer. there is something much more self-feeding about recovery this year. could be a turning point. the objepposite from john rober. we believe a recession/economic slowdown is a possibility in the latter half of 2014 or early in 2015. some of the excesses that could cause a recession are beginning to build in the economy. another piece of data, the biggest problems facing our economy, taxes/regulation, 29%. i would say that's a victory given that europe is not in there for fear of recession is not in there. too much deficit reduction, 16%. slow job growth, 12%. too little deficit reduction, 10%. guys, these are more normal problems, i would say, than we've had in the past. the european financial crisis, u.s. financial crisis. sue, i would take a victory, yes, there are problems out there. >> i totally agree with you. it's the first time in a long time we haven't seen europe on a list like that. >> thank you, steve. >> absolutely. thanks, steve. >> sure. >> the markets h
idea. i mean, if you look at cyprus' economy, there are two major factors to that economy. tourism and financial services. you could kill the financial services immediately right there. so it's two underpinnings. almost like when greece was doing smo of the same things. >> but you say it matters because it could spread elsewhere? >> just the thought that somebody thought this was a good idea is scary enough to me, i would think. but it's going to be one of those things. we'll have to watch and see how it folds out. but i've got a feeling it will have to turn itself around fairly quickly. >> michael, what do you think? have you changed any of your behavior in terms of allocating capital, as a result of what we've seen in the last 48 hours? >> no, not really, maria. i still think that cyprus is certainly something to watch. but i think it's just part of the negotiation process, exactly what's happening in greece. we have to watch and see if it accelerates and this idea sweeps around europe, but i doubt that's going to happen. i actually think that europe is starting to present some o
is not buying it. and some economists are now saying that there's a shadow economy that could explain why the retail sales are rising despite static credit spending and paychecks. an explanation at last. at it all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. >>> from fox, at 3:00 in new york city, seven u.s. marines are dead and several others hurt after a training exercise in nevada. it happened at hawthorne army depot there last night. the military uses that base to store weapons and train troops. according to military sources, large mortar, like the one you see hour, somehow exploded. officials describe frantic scene. it was 45-minute chopper flight to the nearest trauma center in reno. today the white house says the president is watching the developments. >> the president's thoughts and prayers go to the families of those who were lost and those who are injured. we're obviously in the early stages of assessing the incident. it's a tragedy, clearly, and the president was briefed immediately on -- and made aware of it immediately and briefed on it, and we're monitoring the situation.
. connell: highest level close to five years. the economy may be improving. the problem for president obama is his approval rating is not. 47% of americans approving. doug shaw is here to answer that. a record-breaking run last week. you have home production neared the unemployment rate falling. >> first of all, we have dysfunction in washington. we do not have a budget deal. economic growth was tested in the fourth quarter. there is no sign that it is reviving. there really is no revival on main street. connell: is there something politically bad be done? is there something they are not doing right? shouldn't they be better able to take advantage of the perfect stock market and little bit better economic numbers? i think the president is trying to do that now, connell. reaching out to the public senators and paul ryan. we made a deal on the but with newt gingrich. the same thing needs to be done now. dagen: something really struck me. i do not mean to harp on it. the average american wakes up in the morning, you tell me how he feels or she feels that deficit with the daily impact. you kind
food assistance to kids in this country and funding for r&d will drive our economy, but we can't appropriate a sum of money to fix the real cost of iraq. can't pay back the lives of 4,486 american men and women who have died there or the roughly 2,000 broken soldiers who came home and took their own lives. the wounded, physically and mentally, the soldiers who didn't know how not to be a soldier, the families living with a hole in their hearts and the families living with someone they no longer recognize. 10 years leaving their families, living in hell, coming home to unemployment and the homelessness, to a country that's forgotten that it's at war at all, to a country that seems to think a yellow ribbon magnet on their bumper is the only kind of support that oir troops need and the cost in iraq, untold deaths. let me rephrase that. unknown deaths. we can only guess at the destruction that we have left in our wake. 115,000 iraqis, 600,000, you can find the number, what was the long-term impact of that on the environment, the water and health? what happens when someone lives in
times the size of its economy without having some kind of bail structure in a solution, it becomes very difficult. and i think that understanding is quite clear among investors. so from a longer term perspective, i think there's a positive element here which is a more substantial bailin in this solution. >> valentin, what kind of exposure do you have in europe at this point and what changes have you made in regard to how the cypriot levy is handled? >> it is creating a bit of uncertainty. clearly, it comes from lingering uncertainty over the political situation in italy. so all in all, it makes the bit more cautious on europe. not so much on our overall willingness to take risks. we're still overweight global real estate, but we have still put down our exposure in europe, so we are now under weight european equities. we are cautious on peripheral bull markets and european fixed income space. so that is the main changes. still on the regional allocation that we have, but not so much altering our overall willingness to look for risk. i think in general, the broadening of the global cycle
a campaign on jobs and the economy, jobbing and the economy, jobs and the economy and beat that drum until i beat people into sleep. that's part of it, all right, but all of the rest of this has to be added together, or we can never reconstruct this country. we will not get the pillars of american exceptionalism back together. [applause] unless we have the full spectrum. if we can restore our families and strengthen our faith and protect innocent, unborn human life instead of assaulting it with a half a billion dollars appropriated to planned parenthood in a single year. that's gotta go. obamacare has got to go. [cheers and applause] we can't let up on obamacare and believe that somehow we're going to capitulate to that side because the roads are vitality, and it is an unconstitutional taking of god-given american liberty, and it's got to go. [cheers and applause] ronald reagan omelet me down a couple -- only let me down a couple of times in eight years. one of those was 1986, and i still had the dent after i heard on the news he had signed the amnesty act of 1986. but it was on the promise
home building numbers today too. >> that too. we're in a niche market. the u.s. has had their economy outperform other economies and i think it's a flight to safety relative to the u.s. markets on one hand and it's an unwind from the bond market and risk exposure going forward to rate changes on the other hand. so it's both a flight to safety as well as, you know, what's really going on domestically and people are looking at a twist now with the fed and what their posture will be heading forward. >> i'll be back, adobe earnings at the top of the hour. >> take care, maria. >> what do you think? we're finishing positive here. this market doesn't want to go up? you think some of that's short covering? >> i think that's what we're see right now. finishing up the day. right now people will have to play it cautiously. we haven't seen the end of the cyprus thing. we have some negotiating going on from russia. the impact of that, as you mentioned, is a little minor relative to the size and scope of them, but it's whether or not that moves into italy, spain, as we've all been talking about. >>
, ceo and president joins me from new york in a fox bids exclusive. you are bullish on the economy. i want to be there, and there's a mixed bag here, unemployment, 7% to 8% range, forecasted for the year. housing, a little bit of a concern here from economists that the housing market is ahead of itself, but, still, bullish on the u.s. economy, so explain that. >> yes, thanks, cheryl. we are bullish on the u.s. economy, housing continues to come back. you saw the numbers today, but, you know, it's still 15, 20, 25%, spending where you are, in the u.s. 30% where it was at its peak. you know, household formation in the last few years has been delayed because of americans deciding to live with their parents, essentially, but population growth continues. bullish on the housing market driving quite of other consumer demand. cheryl: are you changing your asset allocation mix now? is that something you're in the midst of doing, especially on a day like today and yesterday when there seems to be a lot of money moving around, not a lot of new money, but money moving nonetheless. >> we're not ch
to us that -- quote -- "the need to transform the world's energy economy while addressing global climate change is not only a religious and moral imperative, it is a strategy for security and survival. the united states conference of catholic bishops says that -- and i quote -- "at its core, global climate change is not about economic theory or political platforms, nor about partisan advantage or interest group pressures. it is about the future of god's creation and one human family." the bishops asked congress to consider seven principles in shaping responsible climate change policies. one, addressing global climate change means protecting the common good. two, climate change will hit the most vulnerable communities the hardest. three, we must seek solutions that enhance rather than diminish the economic standing of the poor. four, new resources must be made available to poor communities to adapt to the effects of a changing climate. five, we must protect vulnerable people from the negative human health effects of climate change. six, local affected communities should have a voi
and home inspector and is then that has a booying fantastic on the overall economy having said that i'm not living with my head in the sand here i recognize that a lot of markets are still suffering a little bit and this graph show you's you the change of value in home price from their local market peak to where they are at present the case sowler composite and san francisco is halfway through the pack there down to about 33% and so whole values are still off from where they were before but if you look at where we are from the low point until where we are today, san francisco is looking a little bit better and oakland is not a member city and they randomly take 20 cities that are plead broadly representative of the housing market and san francisco is the second line on here and posted as one of the naysest paces of recovery and so we get some help from residential construction and we also get help from securelier spending this is what i'm showing here and this is the debt service ratio and it's an interesting concept if says if you add up my mortgage payment and car payment and any ot
a commitment to the economy of the whole region as to this particular project. having said that, the super bowl bid is an incredible thing and the strength of our bid is a collaboration of this whole region. this is how we think we will win this bid. this is not for any one particular city, it's us working together. not only on transportation issues, not only on cites, but all the hospitality that we have set. i want to thank all the regionals for working together. we want that super bowl xv very badly. we think we have the greatest opportunity to work for it and not only to win that bid, but to get ourselves in an incredible rotation for other super bowl hosting. we look at this long-term and it's the reasonable approach that will give us the strengths for the nfl to take into consideration. i want to be thankful for all the regions mayor's for joining us and the 49er organization. they brought us together at this time. it's going to be a great thing for san francisco. thank you. >> thank you for coming out. this is an amazing site. there are a thousand people working on this project today. th
of health has come out no. 1 after the economy. the economy is a little bit broad to deal with. that was no. 1. but health was came as far as something that we can do something about. the interesting one for no. 2 and this is the third or fourth year in a row that the quality of public education came out no. 2 and i think when people talk about small business issue, they don't think about that one. no. 3, no surprise, regulations. no. 4, taxation. no. 5, this is another one that i find can kind of interesting. last year it was actually no. 4, but infrastructure. small businesses are concerned about infrastructure, and it's been borne out again by the survey. as far as some of the interesting specifics of the respondents, 48% provide health insurance, 52% did not provide health insurance. interestingly enough and maybe i will talk a little bit more, 74% almost had never heard of the small business tax credit. 63% had never talked to their state senator. their assembly person or to the governor, which i think is a little scary and it's something that hopefully you as a commissioner will re[tp
to the forefront and that's more important. the u.s. economy, china and although there is a big idea they're stealing customer's money and savings accounts is abomination, i believe it's a different european country. entered the european union in 2008, i don't think it will be as big of a deal as people think, i think it will be on the headlines for two weeks. stuart: all right, let's see what's happening on the opening bell, upside. and i'm looking for a gain of 20, 30 points for the time they're open, 10 points higher, 14,462. nicole, let's bring you in. one of your favorite stocks, we're watching it closely. yoga pants, they say they're too sheer. in other words, you can see through them. i think that the stock is way down. nicole: it is way down. it's going to hurt their bottom line. and they're talking about bringing in the pants that are sheer. that basically is like a fall for the company, you can't have pants that are sheer. i have to admit my lululemon, i noticed recently is sheer and it's no joke and you're able to bring them back in, but it's going to hurt their revenue and bot
by the state was a potential death now for the housing and our taxes stopped the growth of our economy. we in this room and many of us working together took on the story changes for our city some of which have vexed for years >> years. i'm proud that together we through innovation and we foerjd our way ahead. to the city commissioners and to the department heads and to our friends in the business, labor you think non-profit and other communities who spent countless hours with us in negotiations and to the great people of san francisco who rewarded us with your support at ballet in san francisco thank you, very much. together we're putting san francisco back on the right track and building a solid foundation for all our residents. my fellow san francisco's we're living in a time of astonishing innovation and unlimited process we're driving that innovation and for or against the future right here right now not just for san francisco but for the whole world. within the lab of our technologies we're developing techniques will will save lives. to our market district we're providing the world w
to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal grab the to bring job training in our mission neighborhood. the supervisor knows about this. these gains are possible because reforms are underway the partnership are in place. for our kids to succeed in this economy we must do more. that's why this year i will propose in my budgeted more resources more than $50,000,000,000 and $25 million for preschool activities. i view education as an be investment not an expense. the folk in the road for many kids and many families the point at which they decide they're though stay in san francisco or leave. you're going to hear me talking about this layoff a lot this year. i want our middle squirrels to courthousess choose the road to success notes the road that leads to trouble or and is the one of the 3 san franciscans who went there know we must continue to pre
of the economy that are not that strong and i don't know what the sequester will bring in the month of april. >> look, the data say things are better, and i think the fed will be under a lot of pressure because interest rates are headed higher. >> at some point the fed will have to acknowledge that -- and they have -- to your point, they changed the language a little bit. it's a moderate recovery and it's a strengthening recovery. words like that. >> right. >> at some point they're going to have to acknowledge what we all seem to know which is -- they're not great, but things are getting better. now will inflation pick up and that, of course, is the fed's number one mandate. will inflation pick up until we see jobs pick up because wage inflation comes with excess demand from workers. i don't know. that's the big trillion dollar question mark. >> commodity inflation whether it be corn or copper and the strong dollar will contain inflation that's going up a great deal. housing is stabilizing and not really in the numbers. i want to take issue with some of what you said. i think we all think th
a gloomy new report on the state of retirement savings. >> the recent headlines about the economy as we've talked about have been pretty good but the lingering effect of the great recession is that a lot of americans have had to dip into their savings to get by. and of course that could be a problem in the years to come for many americans. they're supposed to be the golden years. but a new report says retirement like this is way out of reach for most americans who just aren't socking away enough. even with markets near record highs, the confidence workers have in their retirement is low. the employee benefit research institute found that 49% of americans aren't sure they'll be able to retire comfortably and they're not doing much about it. >> it's one of the scariest things is that it is not just that people don't have a lot of retirement savings. it's they don't know what they need. they don't know what they don't have. so, you know, what you would like to see is more people really sitting down with an adviser doing some hard math. instead, people seem to be crossing their fingers and
for a retirement crisis even as the stock market sits near highs and the economy shows improvement. host: so we're getting your take on this. your retirement andization. tell us if you are and why and if you are not, why not? it's a story in the "usa today" as well this morning confidence in retirement continues to flail about this report, because americans have to cope with many immediate financial concerns retirement is taking a backseat. only 2% of workers and a% of retirees say retirement is their most pressing issues. among other worries -- host: at least many americans have a more realistic perspective about retirement says the senior vice president of retirement and investor services at the principle financial group. host: in arkansas, a democrat, are you saving? caller: yes, i save every penny i can get my hands on. host: 401-k or how are you saving? caller: c.d.'s and bank accounts that are ensured. host: why not put it in the market? caller: i can't afford to lose it. i've seen too many people lose their behinds and with what little money i've saved all my life, i can't afford to lose
of the country. high taxation and high debt are holding back the economy and the g.o.p. believes mr. obama is creating a nation at war with itself. the affluent vs. the nonaffluent. over the weekend senator ted cruze of texas, a conservative, delivered a very emotional speech at cpac. >> my father came from cuba. he had been in prison. he had been tortured in cuba. and he came to texas with nothing, with 100 in his underwear. didn't speak a word of english. washed dishes making 50 cents an hour. in someone had came up to that 18-year-old kid avenue as he was washing dishes and suggested to him that 55 years hence his son would be sworn into office as a united states senator representing the great state of texas. [ applause ] that would have been unimaginable. >> now mr. cruze says his dad made it on his own without government assistance. he worked hard and provide for his family and now his son has achieved the american dream. that's the way this country is supposed to work. but president obama himself has a very compelling story to tell. his father abandoned him. he was raised primarily b
of energy conclude we can safely export natural gas, this is not even about a trade off between the economy and the environment. we can do these projects, prevents these projects will stop a lot of jobs from being created, it is not going to make a development in global emissions. it making no sense to me and the economy. neil: malia. >> i just quickly top say, i understand how we like to take things and combine themm but, i do not think that the only reason why keystone project is not happening is because, barack obama asked his agency this question, to get back to original topic, what i think is really important for us to look forward and you know neil, i don't think that anyone would disagree with you that jobs are important, the problem with laser beam focus you have a society and a lot of things that need to be focused on, laser beaming becomes narrowing, i don't think that is how we' our president or anyone in congress to just have like this one bullet silver bullet solution on what will save the u.s., that is not only thing that u.s. nee right now, we not only have a jobs problem. ne
to do it this way, as for 2014, i thi it depends on the circumstances in the economy. if there is more obama fatigue. lou: can i say, watching the republican party with all prevail -- tre veil, i think that everyone better give up on idea of doing anything with the democrats and letting the economy doing the intellectual heavy lifting for the republican party, they better get ready to go. because, this is not going to be a default election, just as 2012 was. i have to -- i hate to do it, but we have to right there. anyway, thank yo thank you very, that is it for us, we hope you will be us tomorrow, congressman frank wolf of join us. on what is going on in the obama justice department, from new york. york. >> you know every liberal's dream that government seizing your money out right, there is nothing you can do about it. now no cyprus they could find out the hard way, this tiny island nation sent a tsunami shockwave to the rest of the world, keeping the banks closed until they find a more palatable way to. welcome i am neil cavuto, you got 10 grand in a bank account. how about waking
crude prices can tell us about the broader economy. stick around. ♪ ♪ no two people have the same financial goals. pnc works with you to understand yours and help plan for your retirement. visit a branch or call now for your personal retirement review. at a hertz expressrent kiosk, you can rent a car without a reservation... and without a line. now that's a fast car. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >>> good morning. welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm joe kernen along with becky quick and andrew ross sorkin. u.s. equity futures at this hour after giving back about 62, well off the lows yesterday. indicated that a bounce a little, but a time can happen between thou and 9:30 on the east coast. there's energy, you see crude
tourism economy is such a big deal for shore towns, seaside has vowed to be up and open for business on the boardwalk this coming summer. we are back with our monday making a difference report after this. an extraordinary group on the go setting its sights on helping a lot of kids. >>> finally tonight here we have an uplifting making a difference report. tonight from los angeles where things are now looking a lot better for a lot of kids. that's because of the efforts of some caring folks helping kids whose families can't afford the eyeglasses they need, giving them a chance to see and learn and thrive. our making a difference report tonight from nbc's miguel almaguer. >> reporter: for these kids, this bus is a sight for sore eyes. >> this is going to be exciting. >> who gets to go first? >> reporter: an eye clinic on wheels built by vision to learn that provides free eye exams and glasses to students in low-income communities. >> perfect. don't move. >> reporter: fifth grader dina ventura hasn't seen clearly since kindergarten. dina is one of 34 students getting tested at her school
,488. the euro of slightly trading at $1.2948. >> some positive news for the european economy today. airbus has just signed the biggest civil aviation deal in history. it is with ryanair. >> it will provide a much-needed boost to the economy promising to secure 5000 jobs in france alone over the coming decade. >> the signatures are worth a lot of money. airbus will likely discount package of 234 plans, they have a list price of 18 billion euro. assembly will take part in france with parts from several european locations. it will be at capacity for four years. >> of bills meanwhile pride that we epitomize european success. we are working together to create jobs. >> the deal means more than money and well paying jobs. ryanair is a new customer for airbus. they have previously purchased all their planes from their arrival, boeing. >> the western-backed opposition is meeting in istanbul to p ick the new prime minister. the first tasks is creating a cabinet. >> the conflict is expected to escalate further with britain and france say they plan on our main local groups. especially when it comes to pol
as soon as possible and to stir growth. they bumped liquidity into the economy, but he said he took extreme care to make sure the country did not shoulder the countries debt. he also said they could not change fast enough to keep pace with the ageing population and the progress has caused the economy to stall. the consulting chief researcher spoke about his five years in office. he criticized the governor for not working hard enough to pull the country out of deflation. he said he worried too much about the risks of inflation that could set in if he took bold, monetary measures. >> he was able to end deflation. he failed to clearly outlike the boj's responsibilities and to appeal to the public that they would take aggressive steps. >> but he gave him credit for helping to stabilize the financial system. japan did not experience a financial crisis despite the collapse of lehman brothers and the earthquake two years ago. here are the latest market figures. >>> people across iraq are looking back on a war that took away one problem and replaced it with many others ten years ago on marc
to support the innovation economy in the united states. we are looking to produce better and new jobs and position to ensure that america remains at the forefront of the economy in the 21st century. we are working to ensure that all americans have the resources and the skills necessary to fully share in all of the possibilities, civic, social, and economic. all of these made possible by the internet. that is one of the reasons we are here today. he discovered for the administration is the broadband technology opportunities program or btop. this program was established in 2009 by the american reinvestment and recovery act and is administered by ntia. we have nearly $4 billion invested in roughly 230 projects across the country, all aimed at expanding broadband access and adoption in the country. and i want to tell you a little bit about the programs and then tell you about why we care so much about this issue. so, we have the btop for infrastructure projects. these are building broadband networks in areas that are currently underserved. they are making sure that hospitals, schools, and
capital economy will flea to lower tax states. >> we have the right to change the rules op you after the fact, and that's what's nos fair. >> some in sacramento are trying to unwind this. california's not cypress, it's not taking, but to many, it is clearly unfair. >> no, it is. it is so unfair. i mean, changing the rules after the fact is crazy. william thank you for the report. >> you bet. >> well, in the mean time, a huge win if you're one who likes to resell things from ebay to yard sales, and itch ed -- rich edson in washington. rich? >> e bay and overstock.com love the decision. publishers, not so much. the supreme court questioned whether a student could buy cheaper, foreign made and sold textbooks and resell them in the united states for profit. copyrights permits sales only overseas, but the courts said no. once americans buy an item, they buy and resell it of the the other decision could have made it difficult to resell foreign items in the u.s.. libraries say the decision is a landmark win for consumers, small businesses, online marketplaces, retailers, and libraries natio
shall face a total collapse of the banking system and of the whole economy. >> reporter: such talk may well be brinksmanship. it's not. these people and many more across europe would be forever changed by the events of the past three days. >> woodruff: for a closer look at the crisis in cyprus and why it's captured the attention of europe and the u.s., we turn to jacob kirkegaard, a senior fellow at the peterson institute for international economics. welcome to the program. >> my pleasure. woodruff: why does tiny cyprus, a population just over one million, have europe, the markets, the government so rattled? >> i think there's two main reasons. first of all that europe is still kind of on the edge. it doesn't take much to shatter the sort of recent lull of confidence that you have had in europe in the last couple of months. unfortunately, i think cyprus is one such thing. and the other element is that what happens in cyprus and with respect to the cyprusian banks have a large precedent-setting effect for how europe going forward is going to deal with banking crises in other european co
in jobs in the economy, and closes loopholes and preserves the middle class' ability to grow and proceed. so, we now are, you know, in this 30-hour thing. we could actually be debating the budget while those 30 hours tick. we don't have to be sitting here doing nothing. and one of our colleagues said, he'd like to debate the budget two weeks from now. why is he putting things off? well, i guess if i had their budget and looked at it compared to our budget, that's what i'd want to do. but that's not fair and that's not right. so i just came to the floor to join my colleague from washington in pleading with our colleagues, let's have a real debate on the budget. the lines are squarely -- are sharply drawn. our budget and your budget contrast. let the american people hear the debate and decide who they like. we're pretty confident they'd like ours better. you no longer have the talking point, we don't have a budget. so instead you're preventing us from talking about our budget. it is not fair, not right, and doesn't really help the process. so i would hope that i know there are some members
. if the economy hobbles along and don't get me wrong, the markets are roaring, we've had a few days where it has slowed just a bit. but the average american, the pedestrian middle class family how well are they doing? how confident are they? and if the economy slows for them, the prospects for immigration reform, i don't believe are nearly as high, if you don't get what mark has been saying now for over two weeks. the sequencing done right on this cut spending cuts and tax reform. things sound great and they're moving along now. but joe, as we talked about earlier, you're going to have reticent democrats. and even key congressional races who are going to slow down a bit and saying, look, i want immigration and guns dealt with, what are we doing about the economy and the budget, the debt, and tax reform? >> and this is, richard haas, you can only push people so far, i mean, not the republicans' best friend. this weekend said democrats you're about to lose me. i pay 40% federal, 15%. well, i hear we have it cued up. let's go. this is bill maher this weekend. >> -- actually do pay the freight in th
newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the la
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